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Wordless Wednesday Sort of…

April 16, 2014
tags:
Jane jail :(

Jane jail :(

 

pasture regrowth

pasture regrowth

 

hen pecked compost

hen pecked compost

 

hen pecked compost

hen pecked compost

 

raspberry planting crew

raspberry planting crew

 

raspberry planting supervisor

raspberry planting supervisor

 

Berry patch administrator

Berry patch administrator

Gap Months and Fresh Food on the Horizon

April 10, 2014

This time of year will tell you if you planned your pantry well enough last year.  Pantry planning and preserving the harvest is a tall order to fill.  Many times you do have to strike while the iron is hot and preserve a bounteous crop.  Crops fail, time runs out, or life gets in the way.  Our once in a blue moon crop is Italian prunes.  My favorite.  We’ve had two good years in a row, I can’t escape the feeling that we won’t continue to be so lucky.  It’s about the same with wild mushrooms, you just never know what you’re going to get until you get it.

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So as a preserver you soldier on planning for a good crop.  You also try to hedge your bets by using a variety of techniques to bring food to the table year-round.  I would be lost without our freezers, but to have a well-rounded pantry you can’t just rely on a freezer, you need to dehydrate, ferment, can, store and push your seasons by eating fresh for as much of the year as you can.

potting on

potting on

March 29, 2014

March 29, 2014

April 10, 2014

April 10, 2014

Looking at my canned stores right now I can see if my planning worked out and matched our food needs this past winter.  I didn’t can near enough tomato soup, but I have too many whole tomatoes.  I tended to reach for the glut sauce that was a mix of tomatoes and herbs much more than the plain whole tomatoes.  Tomatoes figured heavily in my canning efforts last year, and we’re low on sauce, salsa, soup and glut sauce.  Sigh.  All those tomatoey dishes also leaves me short on canned summer squash.

Cocozelle summer squash

Cocozelle summer squash

and dried oregano.

Greek oregano

Greek oregano

Soon we’ll be eating fresh again.  My thanks to the greenhouse.

Maxibel filet bean

Maxibel filet bean

Dark Red Norland potato

Dark Red Norland potato

MelissaF1 savoy cabbage

MelissaF1 savoy cabbage

Besides canning stores, I have to stare into the depths of the freezers and really reassess what we used, and make adjustments to my seeding and planting plans if need be.  For me the freezer tends to be never-never land unless the item being frozen is in a recognizable form.  Soups and precooked foods just end up being dog food here.  Actually old dog food, because I have good intentions when I commit the item to the freezer and then when I thaw it out – yuck.  Now I just save a step and electricity and give it to the dogs when we’re tired of eating it.  I always have a stock pot going making bone broth, so to take some broth, add some vegetables or leftover meat and make soup is like convenience food in my kitchen.

Freezer stores here consist of meats, butter, berries, fruits, mushrooms, peppers and some vegetables.  Now in early April we are right about where I expected we would be, things are dwindling, but as greens become available, the need/want for berries and fruit seems to wane.  As the years have gone by I have tended to freeze less vegetables in favor of seasonal eating of some crops and just some eating some crops fresh.  Snap peas come to mind.  I have several gallon bags of pods still in the freezer, and peas up and growing in the greenhouse.  We did not eat them at all.

Dry storage crops like potatoes, winter squash, onions and garlic are holding up well too.  It looks like we’ll have a good overlap which is where I like to be this time of year.

So again a learning experience with the pantry.  I’m trying to see the extras as chicken food and not a total waste.

Did you preserve anything last year that you decided was a waste of time?

Out to Pasture and the KISS Method of Temporary Fencing

April 9, 2014
King Alfred I presume

King Alfred I presume

It’s that time of year.  The daffodils, cows, breeding calendar, and the hay stores tell me it’s time to get the cows back out to start the grazing season.   Sacrifice is the name of the game.  Sacrifice grass, cows, hay?  I need to get the cows out to get some spring tonic (greens) through them to get them in shape for calving.   Our first calf could be born as soon as May 12th, so if I want to stick to my 30 day rule of grass before calving I need to get on the stick.  You never win on all counts.  If I graze too early I will lose some production on the grass side.  If I leave the cows in I will feed hay that I feel I can’t spare.  Most importantly I want the cows in good shape and ready to calve in May.  The grass will grow, it always seems to take forever and then the next thing you know it’s so tall you can’t believe it.  So you make a choice, and go with it.  Once I start the grazing season I can’t stop until December.  I’m a little wistful about the chore change.  It’s been a nice break to trek to the haybarn and feed the cows.  If there’s a rainstorm, I can duck inside and wait it out.  Not anymore.  Rain or shine, I need to keep to my schedule of moving the cows every day.  At the same time.  Just like milking.  Talk about a relationship.  I am married to my cows.

Coral the Terrible ready for action

Coral the Terrible ready for action

Elk meets temporary fence

Elk meets temporary fence

Transitioning into spring grazing means going through my fencing supplies and making sure every thing is in working order.  That task usually amounts to straightening bent posts, checking insulators for weak spots, and then out to the field to check fencing,  and build some preliminary fences for the first quick rotation of big paddocks.  No small paddocks this time of year, I need to baby the grass like the salad plants in the greenhouse – a leaf here and a leaf there.  Tender spring baby grass = big paddocks, tall summer grass = small paddocks.

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The pickup bumper is always handy for straightening posts.

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Or if you have a spare bulldozer, you can use the tracks for the same job.  In the field you can use the ground too in a pinch.

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Straight enough for another season.  That’s why I like rebar posts for temporary electric fencing.  They are inexpensive, and they last for years and can be recycled right on the farm when they suffer from metal fatigue from being bent too many times.

Gates in the middle of a run.  One side electrified, one side being held taut.

Gates in the middle of a run. One side electrified, one side being held taut.

I have learned over the years that if I leave some of my temporary fence up (un-electrified) during winter, the deer know it’s there and either go over it or under.  This saves a lot of time the first week of grazing because not much is new except the cows are back, and the deer aren’t surprised by a fence that suddenly appeared overnight.  This two-way gate pictured above actually was a three-way gate for pasture division during winter, but I took out the third one when we moved the cows to the feeding shed for the deep bedding period.

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I won’t be dividing the pastures small at first so these gates are not needed this early on,  this just becomes a line fence.  Tomorrow it will be but a dim memory of what happened here in January because the cows will be onto the next paddock.  We will cut hay here so the pasture will grazed lightly for one day, and then rested until hay time in July.  Now I will remove all these fences and put them into service in other pastures.

Fence hub

Fence hub

Most of our electric fence is powered by a 12 volt battery system.  Maintenance here at the fence hub consists of checking the ground rod connections, mounting the energizer, and installing a freshly charged battery.  This hub is placed at an end brace in one of our permanent cross fences.  Three separate pastures are powered from this hub, gate handles at the terminus or beginning (depending on how you look at it) allow me to unhook the power to the fences I am not using so I can conserve my battery, and not have to spend time to check fences I don’t plan to use immediately.

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For the first day the cows will be in a small field adjacent to where this fence has been all winter, and since this fence was already here, I just needed to change how it ended and have it almost ready for the second day of grazing.  Electric fencing does not need to be connected in a continuous circuit, it can just end.  This is the goofy fence with the gate in the middle in the photos above, so basically I have two spools of fence running from the insulator with two loops from the middle of the run and they end with spools at opposite ends of the pasture.  Many of my fences are long runs for a strip built along a keyline, with shorter cross fences for making paddock divisions.  From a top view it looks like a ladder – the sides are the long runs and cross fences are the rungs.  I confess to some OCDness, but I draw the line at measuring out electric fencing on a daily basis.  (Acreage measurements aren’t as important as teaching yourself to use a grass eye.  You need to be able to judge forage instead of space.)  So I walk twenty paces (I’ve got long legs, my daughter is shorter and she needs to go twenty-four steps to go the same distance) and put in a post, and continue in this manner until I reach the end of the line.  Kind of.  To keep things simple (because this fence won’t be here very long) and to use what I have on hand, I place the second to last post less than ten paces from the end to act as brace for the long fencing runs.  At the end I use two posts close together to hold and store my fence spool, rather than tying it off with twine to something or just hoping it will stay put on one post.  If you figure I have just spooled out 200 yards of wire I need something solid at the end or the weight of that fence will pull over my spool.   Hence the brace post placed with closer spacing near the fence end.  I pull the fence taut, wrap the wire on the insulator on the brace post and then reel out the wire to the end two posts, wrap the wire on the insulators and install the wire spool on the two posts making sure no wire is touching the metal rebar post.  Using the brace post close to the end insures that my fence won’t get pulled over in the night either by sheer tension, or any shenanigans that happen in the dark…

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Electric fencing works because it is a psychological barrier, so I have no need to build Fort Knox every single day.  It’s too much work just to be taken down again the next day.  I can end my fence “near” the permanent fence.  The cows will not get near that gap because they fear that shock.  That’s why you can turn off your fence, build your new fence and the cows will stay put.  It’s all psychological really, they know the fence is likely to be on, or could be, and they also know because your such a diligent farmer that you are there to “feed” them with new pasture.  So if you’re committed to rotational grazing your cows, make sure you don’t damage the relationship with a skewed schedule, strive for about the same time for paddock shift everyday, just like milking a cow.  You have to be there or plan accordingly.

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Day two for that spool that wasn’t connected? I’ll release a loop and lightly twist it onto the hot wire that comes from the hub and runs along my permanent cross fence, now this section is the electrifying portion and I can drop the first fence from the system.  This is just one scenario, and the way the fence is yesterday and today.  Next time it may be a gate hooked into the hot wire instead of the spool.  Just remember to keep the temporary idea in temporary fencing.  The “gate” is also a state of mind.  This morning I released the spool and moved the cows through here instead of making them go to where the actual gate handle was.  We see gate handles, cows see a hole in the fence, they are much more flexible than humans.

Coming to water

Coming to water

Since we’re easing back into daily moves, I try to take every opportunity to call the cows and reinforce that when I call them, they need to come to me.  Water trough placement depends on where your fence is going to be, so many times I don’t move the trough until the new fence is in place, trying to take into consideration if I can span two paddocks and save a day of hauling water.  The cows weren’t thirsty yet yesterday when this photo was taken, but they still came when I called.  They politely took a drink, checked the minerals, gave a cow shrug and then walked off to graze, run and play.  This type of remedial training helps the young ones understand what is expected of them.

Some key points to remember:

♥  Don’t build temporary fence like a permanent fence.  If you make the system too complicated, you won’t be as apt to move it often enough.  Cows are the simplest animals to confine with electric fencing, a single wire does the trick.  Anything more is overkill, which in turn takes more time to set up and then you can defeat the purpose of rotational grazing.  Keep it simple.

♥  Provide fresh range and fresh water daily.  This goes for any species – if you don’t want to drink  the water your animals would prefer not to also.

♥  Transition your animals onto fresh grass slowly, watch their left side for rumen fill and if they are indented a little in front of the hipbone, feed some hay to help them balance their digestive system.   Spring grass is a tonic, and doesn’t offer much in the way of feed value, offer free choice loose minerals too for balance.

♥  Take notes or make a grazing map and date it.  Paddock size depends on time of year and grass growth, you’ll be amazed at what you forget.  My forage changes so much that where I have one large paddock now, come July that same portion of the field may yield twenty-one days of grazing instead of one.  Seeing it on my maps later is helpful information.

♥  If your cows are reluctant to move to the next paddock you’ve made your paddock too big, if they are chomping at the bit, you’ve not allotted enough grass.  Adjust your plans to  match the cows.

♥  Most of all remember that you’ll misjudge the forage from time to time.  Don’t sweat it, and strive to make amends with your cows on the next opportunity.  They won’t hold it against you, I promise.

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Now off to stare at cow rumens!  Happy grazing!

First Salad

April 4, 2014

I have to say seasonal eating brings you some highs and lows.  Come fall I am ready for roots and winter squash.

Salad bed

Salad bed

Now I am ready for spring salads.  The mustards are stealing the show in the greenhouse while the lettuce lags behind.

Foggy Ruby Streaks and Joi Choi

Foggy Ruby Streaks and Joi Choi

I tend to plant my salad beds large so we can begin taking leaves from many plants to fill our salad basket.  The days are still short and oh, so cloudy; leaving more leaf behind will let these plants continue to grow even if I start harvesting.

Dandelion

Dandelion

A quick step into the timber will yield some miners lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata) to go along with the arugula, mizuna, bok choy, and dandelions from the greenhouse.  Spring is here for sure when you have mushroom omelets for dinner (egg bounty too) with salad as a side.  Bring on the abundance!

Dog Days of Spring

April 1, 2014

Run, play, hunt for carrots, and then play some more.  You would  never know these guys had any work to do around here.

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tooth tango

tooth tango

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I've got the carrot!

I’ve got the carrot!

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What?

What?

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That took about five minutes – now it’s nap time again.

Christmas in March

March 27, 2014
Jane's gate

Jane’s gate

All I wanted for Christmas was a working gate in the loafing shed…famous last request.

homemade hinge detail

homemade hinge detail

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But I got a work of art instead.  Beautiful, and a reminder twice a day at least of how talented my other half is.  And as if Jane needed another nickname – now I call her Spiderwoman since she’s always waiting at this gate for morning milking.

 

Gardening Ins and Outs

March 25, 2014

Even with a greenhouse to get gardening started, late March gardening moves at a snail’s pace here in the Cascade foothills.  Slow but sure, some of my direct seeded greenhouse crops are making a showing.

Spring Treat snap peas

Spring Treat snap peas

I stuck my neck out and seeded peas, beets, carrots, kohlrabi and filet beans on March 12.  So far the kohlrabi, beets, peas and a few beans are making a showing.  Not a peep out of the carrots or the potatoes I planted the same day, but that is to be suspected with those two anyway.

Merlin F1 beets

Merlin F1 beets

Kolibri F1 kohlrabi

Kolibri F1 kohlrabi

Outside,  even less is happening.  Hope springs eternal though in the garlic row.

Music garlic

Music garlic

And hope springs eternal in the gardener…I did get a chance to do some ground breaking yesterday.

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Edited to add – this afternoon the carrots, potatoes and beans showed up!  In the volunteer department the naturalized cilantro and orach also peeked out.  Woot!

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