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The Afternoon and Evening “Office”

May 6, 2013

Saturday while I was at this farm I was asked how many hours each day I spent on growing our food, not including cooking or the dairy aspect.  I guessed about 4 hours per day, but the topic begs for its own post really.  I have many thoughts on that very subject and the systems that make that work for us.  Until then, photos and captions can tell the story.

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For dinner, oven-fried homegrown chicken and just picked salad.  I like recipes that I can walk away from after the prep time is over, and this is one of them.  Once the chicken is in the oven, I have and hour or so to do something outside.  Many months of the year this is milking, right now it’s gardening since Jane is dry.  Recipe here in this older post.

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You can’t beat leafy greens for adding to the meal.  Not much of a dinner plan here, just harvesting what is needing harvesting.  This time the colander contains spinach, bok choy, mizuna, lettuce, arugula, cilantro, and komatsuna.

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While dinner is cooking, I need to gather eggs, on the way I stop to admire the mown cover crop in greenhouse 2.

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I discover an errant hen and catch her before she becomes coyote scat.

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I gather eggs, with “help” of course.

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After dinner,  I have some “me’ time in the greenhouse.  While I was picking salad for dinner, I was scoping out a few spots to plant new salad starts that were begging to get out of their flats.  I saved some spaces in the tomato rows just for that purpose.  No plastic mulch but about three feet of good fertile soil.  Perfect for a small bed or two of romaine and other greens.

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Earlier I had planted four rows of early carrots and one row didn’t germinate well (old pelleted seed), so that row becomes a place to plant some more bok choy.

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The evening light in the greenhouse casts a glow on the flats of plants waiting to go to their new homes and gardens, a perfect end to a perfect day.

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7 Comments leave one →
  1. May 6, 2013 8:34 am

    Once again, you show me how much I don’t know. I can’t start plants in flats to save my life.

  2. May 6, 2013 8:39 am

    Wish you lived near me! I would buy some plants. We have people into plant sales here but they only grow tomatoes and cabbage. Also a question… Why are you into the fiesta ware, the collectability, quality, made in usa or none of the above? Beth

    • May 6, 2013 9:08 am

      Beth, he he, as I just got done looking at my tomato and cabbage plants ;) Lots of other stuff too, back to the sauna to plant my alliums today and maybe the one greenhouse will be fully planted.

      As for the Fiestaware, all of the above, but mostly it’s comfort thing, my mom bought her set during the war at the local hardware store, and I grew up with it. I don’t use my vintage stuff anymore, it’s worth too much, but the new is pretty and affordable,and I like the colors. I have collected Fiesta for about 35 years and I have almost all the colors – missing: turf green, white, ivory, sapphire, and the two new ones flamingo and lapis.

  3. Karen permalink
    May 6, 2013 4:41 pm

    I am just starting my garden so I am drooling over all the green ready to plant in yours! As usual everything looks so yummy. Happy Spring!

  4. Theresa Katuski permalink
    May 6, 2013 9:10 pm

    Bliss! is the warm sun, a light breeze, and what you love surrounding.

  5. May 7, 2013 1:34 am

    I see you have a chicken catcher just like ours. :))

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