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Farm Life in Photos

April 30, 2013
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Wood hyacinth

Wood hyacinth

Old farm flotsam

Old farm flotsam

Old flowers, and signs of a homesteading life before this one.  Graniteware, doorknob, zinc canning lid, and woodstove parts – things weren’t much different in the late 1800’s.  Some of these fruit trees pictured below were here then, and some weren’t.  Homesteading life goes on.

Bartlett pear

Bartlett pear

Black Tartarian cherry

Black Tartarian cherry

King apple

King apple

Jane Butterfield

Jane Butterfield

Cows

Cows

Cats

Cats

Sleepy cat

Sleepy cat

Three gray hairs

Three Gray Hairs

Raven

Raven

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10 Comments leave one →
  1. Katharina permalink
    April 30, 2013 6:16 am

    A wonderful post, thank you! I love the old stuff that shows up. On our (suburban) homestead, we keep finding special rocks. My theory is that a husband or son of a previous owner had an extensive rock collection and at some point upset the wife/mother to the point that she scattered the whole thing in the backyard. Or maybe I have an overactive imagination. One way or the other, it’s fun finding treasures as you garden.

  2. Chris permalink
    April 30, 2013 6:28 am

    Gorgeous farm life photos!!

  3. jenj permalink
    April 30, 2013 7:15 am

    Love the old farm flotsam. Our place isn’t very old, but we’ve still found some things from the 1950s here. My favorite is an old Purina feed can. So cool!

  4. April 30, 2013 7:51 am

    Loving your captures of farm life:) Happy Tuesday!

  5. Beth permalink
    April 30, 2013 8:47 am

    Thanks for the post. I have medical appointment today I’m dreading…. and a post from my favorite blogger helped my feelings! Beth

  6. April 30, 2013 11:49 am

    In a way, I have been putting some of your pasture management to work on my yard. Since I live in the boonies and have no homeowner’s association breathing down my neck, I changed how I mow. For starters, I wait until later in the spring for the first mowing, letting the roots get a good head start and letting the grass come up well and good – it’s about 10″ tall right now and I’ll be mowing for the first time tomorrow night. Also, I don’t mow too short – deck on highest level – 5-6″. When it starts to get dry in the summer I leave it alone so as to not stress it. In the fall, I stop mowing far sooner than most because I have found that grass comes through the winter stronger than when it is cut short. And what have I gotten for my experiment? A yard with no dandelions and very few weeds – and I have NEVER treated it with any chemicals nor have I ever aerated it. It is very green and lush. You are right! Work smarter, not harder.

  7. April 30, 2013 3:44 pm

    What a lovely pictorial review! I need to do one of these soon (although it would be much less exciting, what with our sad lack of cows around these parts). 🙂

  8. May 1, 2013 6:07 pm

    I enjoyed these pictures, especially the two cats. They remind me of mine. 🙂

  9. Karen permalink
    May 6, 2013 4:48 pm

    When I clicked on the comment button it brought me back to the very picture that made me comment. Jane! She is so beautiful-finally all grown and filled out. She looks so healthy. Great job raising a beauty of a girl!

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